Consuming Refined Food Can Lead to Depression in Older Women

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Eating more fiber rich foods have many health benefits which we have seen in many articles in this web site.  Some of them are related to heart diseases, high blood pressure and other ailments such as constipation.

However this article which was published in Telegraph UK, based on recent research reveals that refined foods which are devoid of fiber can lead to depression in older women.  Depression because of refined foods happen when insulin tries to bring down the sugar levels too fast.  For more information you can read the article below.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11789103/White-bread-could-lead-to-depression-research-finds.html

White bread and rice could increase the risk of depression in older women, suggests new research.

But whole grain foods, roughage and vegetables could cut it.

Hormone changes prompted by refined foods may reduce blood sugar levels and prompt symptoms of depression, according to the study.

The findings, published in journal The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, could pave the wave for depression being treated and prevented using nutrition. Around three in every 100 people in the UK suffer from depression.

In a study that included data from more than 70,000 post-menopausal women, scientists found a link between refined carbohydrate consumption and depression.

When people consume carbohydrates their blood sugar levels rise to varying degrees.

The glycemic index (GI) scale, of 1-100, measures the amount of sugar found in the blood after eating. The more highly refined the carbohydrate, the higher its score on the GI scale.

Refined foods such as white bread and white rice trigger a hormonal response in the body to reduce blood sugar levels. The response may also cause or exacerbate mood changes, fatigue and other symptoms of depression.

A clear link between high GI scores and consumption of added sugars and refined grains were associated with increased risk of depression in the women.

Meanwhile, diets packed with dietary fiber, whole grains, and vegetables led to a decreased risk.

The researchers said further study is needed to examine the potential of this novel option for treatment and prevention, and to see if similar results are found in the broader population.

Study author Dr James Gangwisch, of Columbia University, said: “This suggests that dietary interventions could serve as treatments and preventive measures for depression.

“Further study is needed to examine the potential of this novel option for treatment and prevention, and to see if similar results are found in the broader population.”

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